Last edited by Kigaramar
Saturday, July 11, 2020 | History

8 edition of Genetically Modified Mosquitoes for Malaria Control found in the catalog.

Genetically Modified Mosquitoes for Malaria Control

Christophe Boete

Genetically Modified Mosquitoes for Malaria Control

by Christophe Boete

  • 346 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by Landes Bioscience, Inc. .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Science,
  • Medical / Nursing,
  • Science/Mathematics,
  • Epidemiology,
  • Life Sciences - Biochemistry,
  • Life Sciences - Genetics & Genomics,
  • Life Sciences - Zoology - Entomology,
  • Control,
  • Genetic engineering,
  • Genetics,
  • Mosquitos

  • Edition Notes

    Medical Intelligence Unit

    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages174
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL12320548M
    ISBN 101587060965
    ISBN 109781587060960

    The release of genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes may offer an alternative strategy to do so while circumventing the pitfalls of current vector control methods. Current methodologies are stalling because of drug resistance, absence of vaccines and inadequate mosquito control techniques. Two rapidly emerging viruses, chikungunya and dengue, are spread by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes (). Vector population control strategies have had variable success, and control by using genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes is under consideration ().In trials, 1 GM variant, the OXA Ae. aegypti, has survived under field conditions and reduced wild-type populations (3,4).

    When the mosquito bites the next person, the parasites enter the person’s bloodstream. Scientists have been exploring the use of genetically modified mosquitoes to prevent the spread of malaria and other diseases. One challenge is ensuring that the modified mosquitoes mate with wild mosquitoes and transfer the protective trait to their offspring.   Gene Knockout Using New CRISPR Tool Makes Mosquitoes Highly Resistant to Malaria Parasite “This gives us a good technological platform for developing advanced malaria-control strategies, based on genetically modified mosquitoes unable to transmit the disease, and for studying the biology of malaria parasites in their mosquito hosts.”.

    Our Work. Target Malaria is an innovative project aiming to reduce the population of malaria-transmitting mosquitoes in sub-Saharan Africa. By reducing the population of malaria mosquitoes, we aim to reduce the transmission of the disease, allowing people in affected areas to live without the burden of malaria and freeing up resources currently used to combat the disease.   A new front has been opened up in the battle against malaria with the release of the first ever genetically modified mosquitoes in Africa.. S sterile male mosquitoes will Author: Sarah Newey.


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Genetically Modified Mosquitoes for Malaria Control by Christophe Boete Download PDF EPUB FB2

Genetically Modified Mosquitoes for Malaria Control (Medical Intelligence Unit) Hardcover – J Find all the books, read about the author, and : Christophe Boete.

Despite a century of research and attempts to control one of the deadliest foes of mankind, the malaria situation remains a major public health problem.

Obviously biological explanations (the resistance of parasites and mosquitoes against available drugs and insecticides respectively) are often given, but they remain partial and by: Genetic Control of Malaria and Dengue focuses on the knowledge, technology, regulation and ethics of using genetically modified mosquitoes to interrupt the transmission of important vector-borne diseases including Malaria.

Everything (or Almost Everything) You Want to Know about Genetically Modified Mosquitoes for Malaria Control but Are (Maybe) Afraid to Ask Christophe Boëte *. * Corresponding Author: Institut de Recherche pour le Développement Laboratoire Génétique and Evolution des Maladies Infectieuses avenue Agropolis, B.P.

Montpellier Ce : Christophe Boëte. Genetically-Modified Mosquitoes for Malaria Control: Requirements to Be Considered before Field Releases Ethics and Community Engagement for GM Insect Vector Release Transgenic Mosquitoes for Malaria Control: Time to Spread Out of the Scientific Arena: Series Title: Medical intelligence unit (Unnumbered: ) Responsibility.

Genetically Modified Mosquitoes for Malaria Control book (GM) mosquitoes have been proposed as part of an integrated vector control strategy for malaria control. Genetic Control of Malaria and Dengue focuses on the knowledge, technology, regulation and ethics of using genetically modified mosquitoes to interrupt the transmission of important vector-borne diseases including Malaria.

It contains coverage of the current state of knowledge of vector-borne diseases and how they are currently controlled; vaccine, drug and insecticide development; various strategies for altering the genome of mosquitoes. Fifteen years ago, a report was published by the World Health Organization that focused on prospects of using genetic modification of anopheline mosquitoes for malaria control.

20 Building on concepts posed in the late s 21 and genetic modification of Drosophila, 22 a strategic roadmap was developed, with the following targets: a transgenic mosquito bya refractory mosquito by Cited by: The recent field releases of genetically modified mosquitoes in inter alia The Cayman Islands, Malaysia and Brazil have been the source of intense debate in the specialized press [1, 2] as well as in the non-specialized mass the first time in history (to our knowledge), transgenic Aedes aegypti were released in the Cayman Islands in by a private company, Oxitec, in collaboration Cited by: 2.

The use of genetically modified mosquitoes (GMMs) for the control of malaria and other mosquito-borne diseases has been proposed in malaria-endemic countries, such as Nigeria, which has the largest burden in Africa. Scientists are major stakeholders whose opinions and perceptions can adversely affect the success of the trials of GMMs if they are not involved early.

Scientists have launched a major new phase in the testing of a controversial genetically modified organism: a mosquito designed to quickly spread a genetic mutation lethal.

This adult Anopheles gambiae mosquito — the kind that spreads malaria — was genetically modified as part of the study. For the first time, scientists have demonstrated that a controversial new kind. Get this from a library. Genetically modified mosquitoes for malaria control.

[Christophe Boëte;] -- Despite a century of research and attempts to control one of the deadliest foes of mankind, the malaria situation remains a major public health problem. Obviously biological explanations (the. for the use of genetically modified mosquitoes to inhibit disease transmission World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, May Report on planning meeting 1 Technical consultation on current status and planning for future development of genetically modified mosquitoes for malaria and dengue control.

Abstract Background: Genetically-modified (GM) mosquitoes have been pr oposed as part of an integrated vector control strategy for malaria control. The Flying Public Health Tool: Genetically Modified Mosquitoes and Malaria Control.

Science as Culture: Vol. 22, Knowing Insects, pp. Cited by:   Researchers at the University of California just published one possible solution: Insert a modified gene into mosquitoes that makes them incapable of carrying the malaria parasite, Maggie Fox. ­­ The idea of using genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes to help wipe out malaria has been around for a while.

Theoretically, if you could create a "better," stronger mosquito that happens to be unable to spread malaria parasites, and you were to release tens of thousands of those better mosquitoes into the wild, they would eventually win the survival game and replace the mosquitoes that are able to spread : Julia Layton.

The genetically-engineered mosquito is incapable of transmitting malaria to humans and can pass on its disease immunity to per cent of its progeny, according to a study. The second study published Thursday uses genetic modification of bacteria found inside mosquitoes to fight malaria.

Researchers genetically modified a Author: William Wan. The researchers genetically modified Anopheles mosquitoes, which in nature spread the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium. The team caged equal numbers of wild and GM mosquitoes and monitored their breeding over 10 generations.

Ninety percent of the offspring in each generation passed along the GM trait.Genetically modified mosquitoes for malaria control; Global disease eradication: the race for the last child; Healing the Land and the Nation: Malaria and the Zoonist Project in Palestine ; Healthfulness of sea-shore resorts: Some Pertinent Facts about Malaria ; Hookworm and malaria in Malaya, Java, and the Fiji Islands ().Compared to conventional technologies for malaria control and eradication, an advantage of GM mosquitoes is that no change in human behaviour is needed for adoption and diffusion, unlike the case of insecticide treated bednets or drugs (Windbichler et al., ).

As well as malaria, GM technology is being developed for insects carrying other Cited by: 1.